BED WETTING

By Dr. Lawrence Wilson

May 2015, L.D. Wilson Consultants, Inc.

           

All information in this article is for educational purposes only.  It is not for the diagnosis, treatment, prescription or cure of any disease or health condition.

 

            Wetting the bed is a common symptom.  It is usually defined as a child over the age of 5 or 6 who still wets the bed.  Boys are slightly more prone to it than girls.  Usually it is not anything to be concerned about.  Most children grow out of it and should not be embarrassed or humiliated for it, as they usually cannot control it.  This article discusses some of the common causes, and what may be done to stop it faster.

 

SIMPLE, MECHANICAL CAUSES

 

            Bedwetting can be due simply to drinking too much water or other liquid near bedtime.  Children with a bedwetting problem may be helped by not having them drink after 7 PM or even earlier in some cases.

Also, children should be encouraged to urinate before going to bed, as otherwise too much urine can accumulate during the night and cause the problem.

Rarely, there is a structural problem with the bladder that causes the problem that might require medical attention.

 

COPPER IMBALANCE

 

            A common cause seems to be excessive copper in the body and perhaps low zinc as well.  This may cause excessive irritability of the bladder, or perhaps the child is simply so deeply asleep that he or she does not realize that urination is occurring.

 

SLOW OXIDATION OR A FOUR LOWS PATTERN IN A BABY OR YOUNG CHILD

 

These can be causes of bedwetting for different reasons.  Slow oxidation means the nervous system is less responsive, and a child may not realize he or she is urinating.

Four lows involves low hair tissue levels of calcium and magnesium.  This pattern could make the bladder more reactive, and perhaps cause a spontaneous urination without a child having the time to stop it before it happens.

 

TOXIC METALS

 

Many toxic metals could also contribute to bed wetting, from cadmium, which interferes with zinc and nervous system development, to lead, arsenic or others.

Rarely, a child could develop a little bedwetting when the body is eliminating a toxic metal that might irritate the bladder.

 

BLADDER INFECTIONS, OFTEN CHRONIC

 

Another cause we encounter, at times, is an infection of the bladder.  The urinary bladder is a common site of infection.  Infection can irritate the bladder, or even affect its nerve supply, causing a variety of symptoms including a tendency to wet the bed.  Often these infections are quite chronic and may not be revealed on standard blood and urine tests.  They usually resolve easily with a nutritional balancing program.

 

In all these cases, when the cause is removed, the bedwetting generally subsides quickly.

 

 

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